Getting Access to Language Data in the Workplace: Role Enactment as a Data-Generation Method

  • Annelise Ly
Part of the Communicating in Professions and Organizations book series (PSPOD)

Abstract

This chapter aims to provide a critical review of two methods commonly used to collect language data in the workplace — naturally occurring data and interviews — and to argue in favour of role enactment to generate reliable and representative data.

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© Annelise Ly 2016

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  • Annelise Ly

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