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The Construction of Adult ADHD: Anna’s Story

  • Alison Davies
  • Mary Horton-Salway
Chapter

Abstract

The diagnostic category of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has only recently included criteria relevant to adults. Consequently, qualitative studies about the personal experience of adults who have a diagnosis, or believe they have ADHD, are uncommon. This chapter briefly introduces adult ADHD, identifying common issues arising from the literature. We apply discursive psychology to examine the construction of adult ADHD in the personal narrative of one mother. Anna’s narrative about her two adult sons who have a diagnosis of ADHD is multilayered and open to interpretation. We show how she constructs the meaning of ADHD and the identities of herself and her sons as examples of ADHD life stories. Our discursive psychology approach examines how her narrative is embedded in the socio-cultural context.

Keywords

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Attention Disorder Discursive Psychology Psychosocial Explanation Adult Diagnosis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended reading

  1. • Groenewald, C, Emond, A., & Sayal, K. (2009). Recognition and referral of girls with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Case vignette study. Child: Care, Health and Development, 35(6), 767–772.Google Scholar
  2. • Rafalovich, A. (2001). Disciplining domesticity: Framing the ADHD parent and child. The Sociological quarterly, 42(3), 373–393.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. • Singh, I. (2004). Doing their jobs: Mothering with Ritalin in a culture of mother-blame. Social Science and Medicine, 59(6), 1193–1205.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Alison Davies and Mary Horton-Salway 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alison Davies
  • Mary Horton-Salway

There are no affiliations available

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