Advertisement

The History and Landscape of Conversation and Discourse Analysis

  • Jessica Nina Lester
  • Michelle O’Reilly
Chapter

Abstract

Mental distress has typically been examined from a biomedical or biopsychosocial perspective with quantitative evidence (especially, randomised controlled trials) being favoured. Over the last few decades there has been a growth and greater acceptance of qualitative methods and an increasing emphasis on applied qualitative research, which has been useful in the field of mental health. However, qualitative evidence has been typically, and arguably inappropriately, placed at the bottom level of evidence in the field of health and medicine (Lester & O’Reilly, 2015). Nonetheless, there is a growing acceptance that qualitative approaches offer a great deal for understanding the complexities of mental distress. More specifically, qualitative methodologies, such as conversation and discourse analysis (henceforth DA), have the added benefit of involving a close examination of the realities of individuals diagnosed with mental health conditions and the many interactions that surround their everyday lives.

Keywords

Discourse Analysis Mental Distress Mental Health Research Conversation Analysis Critical Discourse Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Antaki, C. (2011). Six kinds of applied conversation analysis. In C. Antaki (Ed.), Applied conversation analysis: Intervention and change in institutional talk (pp. 1–14). Hampshire: Palgrave MacMillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Atkinson, P., & Heritage, J. (Eds.) (1984). Structures of social action: Studies in conversation analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bakhtin, M. (1981). Discourse in the novel. In M. Holquist (Ed.), The dialogic imagination: Four essays by Baktin, M. (trans. Emerson, C. & Holquist, M.) (pp. 259–422) Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
  4. Berger, P. L., & Luckmann, T. (1967). The social construction of reality: A treatise on the sociology of knowledge. Garden City, NY: Anchor Books.Google Scholar
  5. Billig, M., Condor, S., Edwards, D., Gane, M., Middleton, D., & Radley, A. R. (1988). Ideological dilemmas. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  6. Bolden, G., & Robinson, J. (2011). Soliciting accounts with why-interrogatives in conversation. Journal of Communication, 61(1), 94–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Clifford, J., & Marcus, G. E. (Eds.) (1986). Writing culture: The poetics and politics of ethnography. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  8. Coulthard, M., & Montgomery, M. (Eds.) (1981). Studies in discourse analysis. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  9. Couper-Kuhlen, E., & Selting, M. (2001). Introducing interactional linguistics. In M. Selting & E. Couper-Kuhlen (Eds.), Studies in interactional linguistics (pp. 1–22). Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Derrida, J. (1981). Positions. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  11. Drew, P. (2015). Conversation analysis. In J. Smith (Ed.), Qualitative psychology (pp 108–142). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  12. Drew, P., & Heritage, J. (1992). Analyzing talk at work: An introduction. In P. Drew & J. Heritage (Eds.), Talk at work (pp. 3–65). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Drew, P., Heritage, J., Lerner, G., & Pomerantz, A. (2015). Introduction. In G. Jefferson (Ed.), Talking about troubles in conversation (pp. 1–26). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Edwards, D., & Potter, J. (1992). Discursive psychology. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  15. Foucault, M. (1972). The archaeology of knowledge and the discourse on language (trans. A. M. Sheridan Smith). New York: Pantheon.Google Scholar
  16. Garfinkel, H. (1967). Studies in ethnomethodology. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice HallGoogle Scholar
  17. Gee, J. P. (2011). An introduction to discourse analysis: Theory and method (3rd edition). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  18. Geertz, C. (1988). Works and lives: The anthropologist as author. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Georgaca, E. (2012). Discourse analytic research on mental distress: A critical overview. Journal of Mental Health, 23(2), 55–61. doi: 10.3109/09638237.2012.734648.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Goffman, E. (1955). On face-work: An analysis of ritual elements of social interaction. Psychiatry, 18(3), 213–231.Google Scholar
  21. Harper, D. (1995). Discourse analysis and ‘mental health’. Journal of Mental Health, 4(4), 347–357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. —. (2006). Discourse analysis. In M. Slade & S. Priebe (Eds.), Choosing methods in mental health research: Mental health research from theory to practice (pp. 47–67). Hove: Routledge.Google Scholar
  23. Hepburn, A. (1999). Derrida and psychology: Deconstruction and its abuses in critical and discursive psychologies. Theory Psychology, 9(5), 639–665.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Hepburn, A., & Bolden, G. (2013). The conversation analytic approach to transcription. In J. Sidnell & T. Stivers (Eds.), The Blackwell handbook of conversation analysis (pp. 57–76). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
  25. Hepburn, A., & Wiggins, S. (2005). Developments in discursive psychology. Discourse & Society, 16(5), 595–601.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Heritage, J. (1984). Garfinkel and ethnomethodology. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  27. —. (2005). Conversation analysis and institutional talk. In K. Fitch & R. Sanders (Eds.), Handbook of language and social interaction (pp. 103–149). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Earlbaum.Google Scholar
  28. Heritage, J., & Robinson, J. D. (2006). Accounting for the visit: Giving reasons for seeking medical care. In J. Heritage & D. Maynard (Eds.), Communication in medical care: Interaction between primary care physicians and patients (pp. 48–85). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Hutchby, I., & Wooffitt, R. (2008). Conversation analysis (2nd edition). Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  30. Jefferson, G. (2004). Glossary of transcript symbols with an introduction. In G. Lerner (Ed.), Conversation analysis: Studies from the first generation (pp. 13–31). Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Kern, F., & Selting, M. (2012). Conversation analysis and interactional linguistics. The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics. Wiley Online Library.Google Scholar
  32. Kitzinger, C. (2005). Heteronormativity in action: Reproducing the heterosexual nuclear family in after-hours medical calls. Social Problems, 52(4), 477–498.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Lester, J. N. (2011). Exploring the borders of cognitive and discursive psychology: A methodological reconceptualization of cognition. Journal of Cognitive Education and Psychology, 10(3), 280–293.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. —. (2014). Discursive psychology: Methodology and applications. Qualitative Psychology, 1(2), 141–143.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Lester, J. N., & O’Reilly, M. (2015). Is evidence-based practice a threat to the progress of the qualitative community? Qualitative Inquiry, 21(7), 628–632.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Marcus, G. E., & Fischer, M. M. J. (1986). Anthropology as cultural critique: An experimental moment in the human sciences. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  37. Maybin, J. (2003). Voices, interextuality and induction into schooling. In S. Goomdman, L. Thersa, J. Maybin, & N. Mercer (Eds.), Language, literacy and education: A reader (pp. 159–170). Staffordshire: Trentham Books Ltd.Google Scholar
  38. Maynard, D. W. (2003). Bad news, good news: conversational order in everyday talk and clinical settings. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  39. Maynard, D. (2013). Everyone and no one to turn to: Intellectual roots and contexts for conversation analysis. In J. Sidnell & T. Stivers (Eds.), The handbook of conversation analysis (pp. 11–31). Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.Google Scholar
  40. Maynard, D., & Clayman, S. (2003). Ethnomethodology and conversation analysis. In L. Reynolds & N. Herman-Kinney (Eds.), Handbook of symbolic interactionism (pp. 173–202). Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira Press.Google Scholar
  41. Maynard, D., Clayman, S., Halkowski, T., & Kidwell, M. (2010). Toward an interdisciplinary field: Language and social interaction research at the University of California, Santa Barbara. In W. Leeds-Hurwitz (Ed.), The social history of language and social interaction research (pp. 313–333). Cresskill, NJ: Humana Press.Google Scholar
  42. Mazeland, H. (2006). Conversation analysis. In Encyclopaedia of language and linguistics (2nd edition, Vol. 3) (pp. 153–162). Oxford: Elsevier Science.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. McCabe, R. (2006). Conversation analysis. In M. Slade & S. Priebe (Eds.), Choosing methods in mental health research: Mental health research from theory to practice (pp. 24–46). Hove: Routledge.Google Scholar
  44. Morgan, A. (2010). Discourse analysis: An overview for the neophyte researcher. Journal of Health and Social Care Improvement, May, 1–7.Google Scholar
  45. Ochs, E., Schegloff, E., & Thompson, S. (1996). Interaction and grammar. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. O’Reilly, M., Dixon-Woods, M., Angell, E., Ashcroft, R., & Bryman, A. (2009). Doing accountability: A discourse analysis of research ethics committee letters. Sociology of Health & Illness, 31(2), 246–291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. O’Reilly, M., Karim, K., Stafford, V., & Hutchby, V. (2015). Identifying the interactional processes in the first assessments in child mental health. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 20(4), 195–201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. O’Reilly, M., & Kiyimba, N. (2015). Advanced qualitative research: A guide to contemporary theoretical debates. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  49. Parker, N., & O’Reilly, M. (2012). ‘Gossiping’ as a social action in family therapy: The pseudo-absence and pseudo-presence of children. Discourse Studies, 14(4), 1–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Peräkylä, A. (2004). Reliability and validity in research based on naturally occurring social Interaction. In D. Silverman (Ed.), Qualitative research: Theory, method and practice (2nd edition) (pp. 283–304). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  51. Potter, J. (1996). Representing reality: Discourse, rhetoric, and social construction. London: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. —. (2004). Discourse analysis as a way of analysing naturally occurring talk. In D. Silverman (Ed.), Qualitative research: Theory, method and practice (2nd edition) (pp. 200–221). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  53. Potter, J., & Wetherell, M. (1987). Discourse and social psychology. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  54. Roberts, F., & Robinson, J. (2004). Interobserver agreement on first-stage conversation analytic transcription. Health Communication Research, 30(3), 376–410.Google Scholar
  55. Roca-Cuberes, C. (2008). Membership categorisation and professional insanity ascription. Discourse Studies, 10(4), 543–570.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Rorty, R. (1989). Contingency, irony, and solidarity. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Sacks, H., Schegloff, E., & Jefferson, G. (1974). A simplest systematic for the organization of turn-taking for conversation. Language, 50, 696–735.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Sacks, H. (1984) ‘Notes on methodology’, in J.M. Atkinson and J.C. Heritage (Eds), Structures in Social Action: Studies in Conversation Analysis (pp. 21–27). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  59. Schegloff, E. (1987). Analyzing single episodes of interaction: An exercise in conversation analysis. Social Psychology Quarterly, 50(2), 101–114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. —. (1999). Discourse, pragmatics, conversation, analysis. Discourse Studies, 1(4), 405–435.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. —. (2003). On conversation analysis: An interview with Emanuel A. Schegloff. In S. Cmejrkova & C. Prevignano (Eds.), Discussing conversation analysis: The work of Emanuel Schegloff (pp. 11–55). Philadelphia, PA: John Benjamins.Google Scholar
  62. Schegloff, Emanuel A. (1992). Introduction. In G. Jefferson, with an Introduction by E. A. Schegloff (Eds.), Harvey sacks: Lectures on conversation (Vol. 1) (pp. ix–xii). Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  63. Schegloff, E. A., & Sacks, H. (1978). Opening up closings. Semiotica, 8(4), 289–327.Google Scholar
  64. Schwabe, M., Howell, S., & Reuber, M. (2007). Differential diagnosis of seizure disorders: A conversation analytic approach. Social Science and Medicine, 65(4), 712–724.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Seedhouse, P. (2004). Conversation analysis methodology. Language Learning, 54(s1), 1–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Sidnell, J. (2010). Conversation analysis: An introduction. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
  67. Silverman, D. (1998). Harvey Sacks: Social science and conversation analysis. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  68. Sinclair, J., & Brazil, D. (1982). Teacher talk. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  69. Sinclair, J., & Coulthard, M. (1975). Towards an analysis of discourse. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  70. —. (1992). Towards an analysis of discourse. In M. Coulthard (Ed.), Advances in spoken discourse analysis (pp. 1–34). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  71. Stivers, T. (2002). Presenting the problem in pediatric encounters: ‘Symptoms only’ versus ‘candidate diagnosis’ presentations. Health Communication, 14(3), 299–338.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  72. Stribling, P., Rae, J., & Dickerson, P. (2009). Using conversation analysis to explore the recurrence of a topic in the talk of a boy with an autism spectrum disorder. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, 23(8), 555–582.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Strong, T., Busch, R., & Couture, S. (2008). Conversational evidence in therapeutic dialogue. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 34(3), 388–405.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Wilkinson, R. (2015). Conversation and aphasia: Advances in analysis and intervention. Aphasiology, 29(3), 257–268.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Winch, P. (1967). The idea of a social science and its relation to philosophy. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  76. Wittgenstein, L. (1958). Philosophical investigations (2nd edition) (trans. G. E. M. Anscombe). Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  77. Wooffitt, R. (2005). Conversation analysis and discourse analysis: A comparative and critical introduction. London: Sage.Google Scholar

Recommended reading

  1. • Antaki, C. (2011). Six kinds of applied conversation analysis. In C. Antaki (Ed.), Applied conversation analysis: Intervention and change in institutional talk (pp. 1–14). Hampshire: Palgrave MacMillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. • Heritage, J. (2005). Conversation analysis and institutional talk. In K. Fitch & R. Sanders (Eds.), Handbook of language and social interaction (pp. 103–149). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Earlbaum.Google Scholar
  3. • Lester, J., & O’Reilly, M. (2015). Is evidence-based practice a threat to the progress of the qualitative community? Arguments from the bottom of the pyramid. Qualitative Inquiry, 21(7), 628–632.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. • O’Reilly, M., & Kiyimba, N. (2015). Advanced qualitative research: A guide to contemporary theoretical debates. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  5. • Sacks, H., Schegloff, E., & Jefferson, G. (1974). A simplest systematic for the organization of turn-taking for conversation. Language, 50, 696–735.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. • Seedhouse, P. (2004). Conversation analysis methodology. Language Learning, 54(s1), 1–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Jessica Nina Lester and Michelle O’Reilly 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jessica Nina Lester
  • Michelle O’Reilly

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations