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Mental Health Treatment Planning: A Dis/Empowering Process

  • Michael A. Mancini
Chapter
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Abstract

The model of mental health recovery has become a guiding vision for mental health services around the world (Hopper, Harrison, Janca, & Sartorius, 2007; Saxena & Setoya, 2014; Slade, Adams, & O’Hagan, 2012). Professionally derived definitions of recovery have focused more on clinical outcomes such as enhanced psychosocial functioning, reduced symptomology, decreased hospitalisation days, and increased stable housing (Moran, et al., 2014; Slade et al., 2012). Another definition of recovery is grounded in the narratives of psychiatric service users (Mead & Copeland, 2000). In this definition, recovery is defined as a personal journey of transformation from an illness-dominated identity marked by helplessness and hopelessness to a positive identity marked by meaning, self-determination, independence, and holistic well-being (Andresen, Oades, & Caputi, 2003; Anthony, 1993; Mancini, Hardiman, & Lawson, 2005).

Keywords

Service User Community Mental Health Team Leader Case Worker Discursive Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended reading

  1. • Davidson, L., Rowe, M., Tondora, J., O’Connell, M. J., Staeheli-Lawless, M. (2009). A practical guide to recovery-oriented practice: Tools for transforming mental health care. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  2. • Fairclough, N. (2003). Analyzing discourse: Textual analysis for social research. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. • Foucault M. (1977). Discipline and punish: The birth of the prison. London: Allen Lane.Google Scholar
  4. • Mancini, M. A. (2011). Understanding change in community mental health practices through critical discourse analysis. British Journal of Social Work, 41(4), 645–667.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. • Mancini, M. A. & Miner, C. S. (2013). Learning and change in a community mental health setting. Journal of Evidence Based Social Work, 10(5), 494–504.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. • Rogers, R. (2011) (Ed.), An introduction to critical discourse analysis in education (2nd edition). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Michael A. Mancini 2016

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  • Michael A. Mancini

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