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Making Mental Disorders Visible: Proto-Morality as Diagnostic Resource in Psychiatric Exploration

  • Jörg R. Bergmann
Chapter

Abstract

In the same manner in which problems of physical health are identified in medical practice as problems residing within an individual’s body, problems of mental health are typically located as problems within an actor’s mind, personality, or physical condition. This coupling of physical and mental reality has crucial epistemological and practical implications.

Keywords

Mental Disorder Mental Health Professional Mental Hospital Psychiatric Interview Candidate Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended reading

  1. • Bergmann, J. R. (1992). Veiled morality. Notes on discretion in psychiatry. In P. Drew & J. Heritage (Eds.), Talk at work. Interaction in institutional settings (pp. 137–162). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  2. • Coulter, J. (1973). Insanity ascription. In J. Coulter (Ed.), Approaches to insanity. A philosophical and sociological study (pp. 112–144). London: Martin Robertson.Google Scholar
  3. • Roca-Cuberes, C. (2008). Membership categorization and professional insanity ascription. Discourse Studies, 10(4), 543–570.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Jörg R. Bergmann 2016

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  • Jörg R. Bergmann

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