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The Process of Social Labelling of Mental Illness: An Analysis of Family Conversations

  • Milena Silva Lisboa
  • Mary Jane Paris Spink
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Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to illustrate the use of Conversation Analysis for understanding the relational nature of what is conventionally called ‘madness/mental illness’. It begins with a brief presentation of Labelling Theory, a sociological approach based on the analysis of social reactions to normative deviations. The section introduces the psycho-sociological concepts that are relevant to the process of identification of a particular deviance as ‘mental illness’ and its normalisation, stabilisation, and/or amplification with focus on the interactions within the family and psychiatry services.

Keywords

Mental Illness Mental Health Service Social Reaction Conversation Analysis Labelling Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended reading

  1. • Buttny, R. (1993). Social accountability in communication. London, New York, New Delhi: Sage.Google Scholar
  2. • Sacks, H. (1992). Lectures on conversation (Vols. I-II). Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Milena Silva Lisboa and Mary Jane Paris Spink 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Milena Silva Lisboa
  • Mary Jane Paris Spink

There are no affiliations available

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