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Psychogenic Non-epileptic Seizures: How Doctors Use Medical Labels when They Communicate and Explain the Diagnosis

  • Chiara M. Monzoni
  • Markus Reuber
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  • 989 Downloads

Abstract

Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) superficially resemble epileptic seizures, but are not associated with ictal electrical discharges in the brain. PNES are episodes of paroxysmal impairment of self-control, which represent an experiential or behavioural response to distress. The most effective treatment of PNES involves psychotherapy (LaFrance, Reuber, & Goldstein, 2013).

Keywords

Epileptic Seizure Negative Formulation Diagnostic Label Seizure Symptom Nonepileptic Seizure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended reading

  1. • Benbadis, S.R. (2010). Psychogenic nonepileptic ‘seizures’ or ‘attacks’? It’s not just semantics: Attacks. Neurology, 75(1), 84–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. • Kanaan, R., Armstrong, D., & Wessely, S. (2009). Limits to truth-telling: neurologists’ communication in conversion disorder. Patient Education & Counseling, 77(2), 296–301.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. • LaFrance, W.C. Jr. (2010). Psychogenic nonepileptic ‘seizures’ or ‘attacks’? It’s not just semantics: Seizures. Neurology, 75(1), 87–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. • Monzoni, C. M., & Reuber, M. (2015a). Linguistic and interactional restrictions in an outpatient clinic: The challenge of delivering the diagnosis and explaining the aetiology of functional neurological problems. In F. Chevalier & J. Moore (Eds.), Constraints and interactional restrictions in institutional talk: Studies in Conversation Analysis (pp. 239–270). Amsterdam: Benjamins.Google Scholar
  5. • Plug, L., Sharrack, B., & Reuber, M. (2009). Seizure, fit or attack? The use of diagnostic labels by patients with epileptic or non-epileptic seizures. Applied Linguistics, 31, 1–21.Google Scholar
  6. • Teas-Gill V., & Maynard D.W. (1995). On ‘labelling’ in actual interaction: Delivering and receiving diagnoses of developmental disabilities. Social Problems, 42, 11–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Chiara M. Monzoni and Markus Reuber 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chiara M. Monzoni
  • Markus Reuber

There are no affiliations available

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