Advertisement

The Experiences of International Students in the Classroom and in the University

Chapter
  • 95 Downloads

Abstract

In looking at international students in the university, it is useful to compare the different experiences of students in two widely differing higher education (HE) contexts, the United Kingdom and Japan. Both countries have developed economies and are keen to attract international students, despite a wide variation in the motivations of recruiters, government policy makers, and recruited international students. The contrasting experience of students in China, Malaysia, and the United States will also be briefly compared.

Keywords

International Student Chinese Student Chinese Learner Japanese Language Asian Context 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ballard, B. (1996). “Through Language to Learning: Preparing Overseas Students for Study in Western Universities.” In H. Coleman (Ed.), Society and the Language Classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 146–168.Google Scholar
  2. Bradford, A. (2013). “English-Medium Degree Programs in Japanese Universities: Learning from the European Experience.” Asian Journal of Development Studies. 3.3: 225–240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Burley, K. M., J. R. Walton, and E. Uruchurtu. (2009). “Enhancing the Learning Experience of Post-Graduate Students from the Indian Sub-Continent.” Paper presented at the EAIR Forum, Vilnius, Lithuania, August 2009. http://eairaww.websites.xs4all.nl/forum/vilnius/presentations.asp (Participants’ password now needed for access)Google Scholar
  4. Chao, R. (2013). Chinese Offshore Branch Campuses: China’s Latest Exports. http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/world-view/chinese-offshore-branch-campuses-chinas-latest-exportsGoogle Scholar
  5. Chikada, M., and T. Coverdale-Jones. (2010). Lecturers’ Perceptions of Teaching International Students. Presented at Academic Consortium 21, Shanghai Xiaotong University, October 19, 2010. http://gse.sjtu.edu.cn/ac21/program.htmGoogle Scholar
  6. Choudaha, R., L. Chang, and Y. Kono. (2013). “International Student Mobility Trends 2013: Towards Responsive Recruitment Strategies.” WES Research & Advisory Services, http://wenr.wes.org/2013/03/wenr-march-2013-international-student-mobility-trends-2013-towards-responsive-recruitment-strategies/Google Scholar
  7. Clark, R., and S. Gieve. (2006). “On the Discursive Construction of ‘The Chinese Learner.’” Language, Culture and Curriculum. 19.1: 54–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Clothey, R. (2012). “Internationalisation of Higher Education Institutions in China: Two Universities: Two Approaches.” In T. Coverdale-Jones (Ed.), Transnational Higher Education in the Asian Context. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan. 68–81.Google Scholar
  9. Coverdale-Jones, T. (2006). East Asian Learners’ Response to Intercultural Themes as Part of the Year Abroad in the UK. LLAS Pedagogic Research Fund 2005/06. https://www.llas.ac.uk/projects/2307Google Scholar
  10. —. (2008). “Afterword: Responses to Internationalisation in the UK and a Survey on Responses to Intercultural Communication Teaching.” In T. Coverdale-Jones and P. Rastall (Eds.), Internationalising the University: The Chinese Context. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan. 223–238.)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. —. (2012a) “International Approaches to Transnational Higher Education.” Nagoya Journal of Higher Education. 12: 193–209.Google Scholar
  12. —. (2012b). “Internationalisation of Higher Education in Japan and the UK—Similarities and Contrasts.” In T. Coverdale-Jones (Ed.), Transnational Higher Education in the Asian Context. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan. 49–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. —. (2012c). “Introduction: The Widening Context of Transnational Higher Education.” In T. Coverdale-Jones (Ed.), Transnational Higher Education in the Asian Context. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan. 1–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. —. (2012d). Transnational Higher Education in the Asian Context. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. —. (2008). Internationalising the University: The Chinese Context. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. English-Taught Programs at Chinese Universities. (2014). http://www.china.org.cn/english/LivinginChina/184768.htm
  17. Hall, E. T. (1976). Beyond Culture. Garden City: Anchor Books.Google Scholar
  18. Hall, E. T., and M. R. Hall. (1990). Understanding Cultural Differences: Germans, French and Americans. Yarmouth: Intercultural Press.Google Scholar
  19. Hartig, F. (2011). “Confucius Institutes and the Rise of China,” Journal of Chinese Political Science 17.1 (March 2012): 53–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Higher Education Academy. (2014). “Transnational Education and Internationalisation of the Curriculum.” https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/resources/detail/internationalisation/ISL_Internationalising_the_curriculumGoogle Scholar
  21. Jackson, J. (2010). Intercultural Journeys: From Study to Residence Abroad. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. JASSO (Japan Student Services Organization). (2013). “International Students in Japan 2012.” http://www.jasso.go.jp/statistics/intl_student/data12_e.html#no6Google Scholar
  23. Jones, E., and D. Killick. (2007). “Internationalisation of the Curriculum.” In E. Jones and S. Brown (Eds.), Internationalising Higher Education. Abingdon: Routledge. 109–119.Google Scholar
  24. Lankov, A. (2007). The Dawn of Modern Korea. Seoul: EunHaeng NaMu.Google Scholar
  25. Leask, B. (2009). “Using Formal and Informal Curricula to Improve Interactions between Home and International Students.” Journal of Studies in International Education. 13.2: 205–221.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology). (2014). “The ‘Global 30’ Project to Invite 300,000 International Students to Japan.” http://www.uni.international.mext.go.jp/global30/Google Scholar
  27. Mori, J. (2011). “G30 and Its Implications for Japan.” Abstract. The International Research Center Bulletin. 1: 63–71. http://hdl.handle.net/2433/139266Google Scholar
  28. Morita, L. (2013). “Do Japanese Undergraduates Think They Will Be in an International Environment?” International Journal of Higher Education. 3.1: 58–65. http://sciedu.ca/journal/index.php/ijhe/article/viewFile/3754/2215Google Scholar
  29. Open Doors (2013). “Trends and Global Data 2013.” http://www.iie.org/Research-and-Publications/Open-DoorsGoogle Scholar
  30. Project Atlas (2011). “Trends and Global Data 2011.” http://www.iie.org/en/research-and-publications/~/media/Files/Services/ProjectAtlas/Project-Atlas-Trends-and-Global-Data-2011.ashxGoogle Scholar
  31. Rivers, D. J. (2011). “The Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education Institutions: Implications for 2012 and Beyond.” In C. Ward (Ed.), Language Education: An Essential for a Global Economy: Anthology Series #52. Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre. 237–257.Google Scholar
  32. Ryan, J. (2010). “Chinese Learners: Misconceptions and Realities.” In J. Ryan and G. Slethaug (Eds.), International Education and the Chinese Learner. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press. 37–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Ryan, J., and G. Slethaug. (Eds.). (2010). International Education and the Chinese Learner. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Slethaug, G., and J. Manjula. (2012). “Interpreting Malaysian Results in International Education Assessments.” In T. Coverdale-Jones, Transnational Higher Education in the Asian Context. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan. 195–215.Google Scholar
  35. Tan, T., and J. Weidman. (2012). “Chinese Graduate Students’ Adjustment to Academic Demands in American Universities.” In T. Coverdale-Jones, Transnational Higher Education in the Asian Context. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan. 118–131.Google Scholar
  36. Tanikawa, M. (2013). “Scholarships to Encourage More Japanese to Study Overseas.” New York Times, May 5.Google Scholar
  37. UNESCO. (2012). “Global Flow of Tertiary-Level Students.” http://www.uis.unesco.org/education/Pages/international-student-flow-viz.aspxGoogle Scholar
  38. Verbik, L., and V. Lasanowski. (2007). “International Student Mobility: Patterns and Trends.” World Education News and Reviews, October 1. http://www.wes.org/educators/pdf/StudentMobilitypdf
  39. Yonezawa, A. (2011). “The Internationalization of Japanese Higher Education: Policy Debates and Realities.” Higher Education Dynamics. 36: 329–342. DOI: 10.1007/978–94-007–1500-4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Yonezawa, A., H. Akiba, and D. Hirouchi. (2012). “Japanese University Leaders’ Perceptions on Internationalisation: The Role of Government in Review and Support.” In T. Coverdale-Jones, Transnational Higher Education in the Asian Context. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan. 15–31.Google Scholar
  41. Zheng, L. (2012). “Insight into UK China Articulation Programmes and Internationalisation: What Has Changed in the Last Few Years?” In T. Coverdale-Jones, Transnational Higher Education in the Asian Context. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan. 32–48.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Gordon E. Slethaug and Jane Vinther 2015

Authors and Affiliations

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations