Advertisement

Introduction

Chapter
  • 85 Downloads

Abstract

Over four million university students go abroad annually to study, roughly the same number that attend the international campuses of American and British universities as well as those from other countries, and an additional five million students attend international secondary schools at home or abroad. International education has become a fixed reality for universities and schools in such native English-speaking countries as the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, and Canada, but also increasingly in large non-native English-speaking countries, such as China, France, Germany, Russian Federation, Japan, Italy, and Malaysia (see table 1.1 for the top ten countries involved).1 It has also become important to smaller Scandinavian countries where English is not native, but is spoken with relative ease and proficiency by the majority of the population. Then, too, international education has become big business, generating billions of dollars, pounds, renminbi, kroner, and other currencies to assist universities and local businesses in the host countries.

Keywords

International Student Chinese Learner Liberal Education International Education Student Mobility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bernstein, B. (1996). Pedagogy, Symbolic Control and Identity: Theory, Research, Critique. London: Taylor and Francis.Google Scholar
  2. Biggs, J., and D. Watkins. (1996). “The Chinese Learner in Retrospect.” In In J. B. Biggs and D. A. Watkins, (Eds.) The Chinese Learner: Cultural, Psychological and Contextual Influences. Hong Kong: Comparative Education Research Centre, the University of Hong Kong.Google Scholar
  3. Biggs, J., and D. Watkins. (2001). “Insights into Teaching the Chinese Learner.” In J. B. Biggs and D. A. Watkins (Eds.), Teaching the Chinese Learner: Psychological and Pedagogical Perspectives. Hong Kong: Comparative Education Research Centre, the University of Hong Kong. 277–300.Google Scholar
  4. Carroll, J. (2002). “Suggestions for Teaching International Students More Effectively.” Learning and Teaching Briefing Paper Series. Accessed August 8, 2014. http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/ocsld/resources/briefing_papers/international_students.pdf
  5. Clark, R., and S. Gieve. (2006). “On the Discursive Construction of ‘The Chinese Learner.’” Language, Culture and Curriculum. 19.1: 54–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Coverdale-Jones, T., and P. Rastall. (2009). Internationalising the University: The Chinese Context. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  7. Jin, L., and M. Cortazzi. (2006). “Changing Practices in Chinese Cultures of Learning.” Language, Culture and Curriculum. 19.1: 5–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Institute of International Education. (2013). “Atlas of Student Mobility.” Downloaded May 29, 2014. http://www.atlas.iienetwork.org Google Scholar
  9. Ninnes, P., C. Aitchison, and S. Kalos. (1999). “Challenges to Stereotypes of International Students’ Prior Educational Experience.” Higher Education Research and Development. 18.3: 323–342.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Ninnes, P., and M. Hellsten. (Eds.) (2005). Internationalizing Higher Education: Critical Explorations of Pedagogy and Policy. Hong Kong: Comparative Education Research Centre, the University of Hong Kong.Google Scholar
  11. Ryan, J., and G. Slethaug. (Eds.) (2010). International Education and the Chinese Learner. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Ryan, J. (2000). A Guide to Teaching International Students. Oxford: Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development.Google Scholar
  13. Ryan, J., and J. Carroll. (Eds.). (2005). Teaching International Students: Improving Learning for All. London: Routledge. 3–10.Google Scholar
  14. Slethaug, G. E. (2007). Teaching Abroad: International Education and the Cross-Cultural Classroom. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.Google Scholar
  15. UNESCO. (2014). “Global Flow of Tertiary Students.” Institute of Statistics. Accessed August 16, 2014. http://www.uis.unesco.org/Education/Pages/international-student-flow-viz.aspxGoogle Scholar
  16. Vinther, J. (2010). “A Danish Perspective on Teaching Chinese Students in Europe.” In J. Ryan and G. Slethaug (Eds.), International Education and the Chinese Learner. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press. 111–127.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Gordon E. Slethaug and Jane Vinther 2015

Authors and Affiliations

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations