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Public Screenings Beside Screens: A Spatial Perspective

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Abstract

This chapter seeks to establish a spatial perspective on screens in the post-cinematic context, which concerns screens outside their conventional habitats like home and cinema. If contemporary urban living is increasingly reliant upon the use of various communication technologies (both ‘public’ and ‘personal’ media, such as mobile phones, tablets, information panels, computer terminals, billboards, media façades) this means that, whatever the device, interaction is mediated by one elementary form, the screen. It has served rather different kinds of communications in various epochs. Ever since the inventions of canvas and lampshade, up to the deployment of photography, cinema and television, dominant cultural forms of screens have been ‘the window, the frame and the mirror’ (Casetti, 2013, p. 29). Contemporary media environments now also include screens like touch pads, surveillance monitors and interactive interfaces, which means that the definite space of cinematic projection is now paralleled by convoluting surfaces of data (Casetti, 2013, p. 30). In turn, the showcasing of cinematic narratives concerning ‘electronic representation’, a space structured for sustained reflection, is increasingly supplemented with the streamlining of information, which is essentially about ‘electronic presence’ (Robins, 1996, p. 141).

Keywords

Social Space Urban Space Social Harmony Spatial Perspective Medium Space 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Zlatan Krajina 2015

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