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The Benefactor: NGOs and Humanitarian Aid

Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Macmillan Series in Global Public Diplomacy book series (GPD)

Abstract

Recognizing the potentially substantial role that public diplomacy can play in exerting its growing soft power both domestically and internationally, Turkey has continually sought to expand its sphere of influence over the last decade. It is ranked as the world’s third largest humanitarian donor state. Humanitarian assistance by governmental and nongovernmental organizations constitutes an integral component of Turkey’s foreign policy toolkit, which derives from a value-based orientation.1 Turkey’s humanitarian assistance and mediatory efforts can be characterized as long-term relationship building public diplomacy tools. These efforts are intended to expand Turkey’s global soft power in developing regions, establish ties through credibility, and then engage in emerging economic markets.

Keywords

Foreign Policy Middle East Civic Engagement Global Governance Soft Power 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© B. Senem Çevik and Philip Seib 2015

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