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Die Antwoord: The Answer to the Unspoken Question

  • Katarzyna Chruszczewska
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Part of the Pop Music, Culture and Identity book series (PMCI)

Abstract

A South African group Die Antwoord, which in Afrikaans means ‘the answer’, began their international career almost immediately after the recording of their first album $O$ (2009). The music they perform, defined by them as ‘zef style’, is a mix of rave and rap juxtaposed with the overwhelming visuality of their videos.1 The phenomenon of their rapid popularity seems to be the result of a striking contrast provided by their street music and the sophisticated visual brut aesthetics that is inspired by the most prominent contemporary African artists.

Keywords

Popular Music Music Genre South African Society Gang Affiliation Lady Gaga 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Katarzyna Chruszczewska 2015

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  • Katarzyna Chruszczewska

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