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Why the Asian Craze for Publication?

An Examination from Academic Regime
  • Po-fen Tai
Chapter
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Part of the International and Development Education book series (INTDE)

Abstract

Over the past two decades, A sia n countries have been engaged in an academic competition for academic publishing, and this amazing growth of academic publications is found in Singapore, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China where countries are regarded as newly industrialized economies (NIEs). According to the databases of Thomson Reuters, the volume of publications in the East Asian NIEs has exceeded that of the United States, which was the main contributor for academic publications between 2006 and 2010 (Taiwan Research Report 2011, 5). Taking 1991 as the baseline year where the index equals 100, South Korea, China, Singapore, and Taiwan all have experienced significant growth in the publication volume, more rapidly than the United States and Japan, the world’s leading nations for innovation and technology (Figure 5.1).

Keywords

High Education Public Investment Academic Community Academic Staff Publication Market 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© John N. Hawkins and Ka Ho Mok 2015

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  • Po-fen Tai

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