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That’s Entertainment? Thoroughbreds, Precarious Lives, and the Future of Jumps Racing

  • Phil McManus
Part of the Leisure Studies in a Global Era book series (LSGE)

Abstract

Animals have been used to entertain humans for thousands of years. The global horse racing industry exists for human entertainment. Within this diverse industry, certain practices are more controversial than others. Using the notions of agency and precariousness, this chapter explores a range of the most controversial issues facing the industry, and situates them within the risk-intentionality-response spectrum that highlights how various animal-dependent leisure activities have been targeted for elimination or reform.

Keywords

Response Spectrum Horse Racing Animal Relation Cultural Geography Racing Performance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Phil McManus 2015

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  • Phil McManus

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