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Children of Imprisoned Parents and Their Human Rights

  • Peter Scharff Smith
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Prisons and Penology book series (PSIPP)

Abstract

Traditionally, discussions, research and court judgements within the field of prisons and human rights have almost exclusively been a matter of balancing the state’s legitimate use of power and security concerns against the individual prisoners’ rights. The question of whether, how and to what degree the use of imprisonment has also affected the rights of people living outside of prison has for many years been left out of consideration. This has certainly been the case with prisoners’ children — a group of people whose rights are clearly affected through the use of imprisonment.

Keywords

Family Life United Nations Good Interest Parental Imprisonment Social Authority 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
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  3. 3.
    “The heyday of the prisoners’ rights movement roughly spanned the period from 1960 to 1980.” See James B. Jacobs, Stateville. The Penitentiary in Mass Society (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004), 183.Google Scholar
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    For a discussion of article 3 and the exact wording — and the implications of this — see Jean Tomkin, Orphans of Justice. In Search of the Best Interests of the Child When a Parent is Imprisoned: A Legal Analysis (Geneva: Quaker United Nations Office, August 2009), 20 f.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Peter Scharff Smith 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Scharff Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.Danish Institute for Human RightsDenmark

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