Advertisement

Conclusion

  • Jane L. Chapman
  • Dan Ellin
  • Adam Sherif
Chapter
Part of the The Holocaust and Its Contexts book series (HOLC)

Abstract

Comics have a role as sources for gauging awareness of the Holocaust in regard to specific historiographies, and they can also be analysed through close reading for specific value as sources. Both of these tasks extend discussions on methodology. The value of testimonial and its position within memory studies, as well as the issue of trauma as informed by trauma studies, takes on a new significance when paired with comics. These fields connect through the shared ground of cultural record, as either deliberate/explicit or incidental reference. Comics can transform images into narrative and explore the space between reality and representation, with the visuals working as iconic translations. The form provides succinct representations of emotions and experiences, with narrative structure relying on readers’ mental contribution.

Keywords

Cultural History Comic Strip Close Reading Narrative Structure Comic Book 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Jane L. Chapman, Dan Ellin and Adam Sherif 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane L. Chapman
    • 1
  • Dan Ellin
    • 1
  • Adam Sherif
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LincolnUK

Personalised recommendations