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Reawakening Enlightenment? Contesting Religion and Politics in European Public Discourse

  • Anders Berg-Sørensen
Part of the Palgrave Politics of Identity and Citizenship Series book series ( CAL)

Abstract

Free speech has become a battle point between religious and secular political movements in twenty-first century European public discourse. Consider a few highly contested recent cases: the movie Submission and the murder of its director Theo van Gogh in November 2004; the twelve cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad published in the Danish daily newspaper Jyllands-Posten in September 2005 and the subsequent death threats, impassioned demonstrations, burning of flags and embassies in Muslim countries; the debate on the Qur’an critical movie Fitna released in March 2008 by Dutch right-wing politician Geert Wilders, founder of the Party for Freedom fighting against immigration; the debate on boycotting the UN Durban Review Conference in April 2009 because of restrictions of free speech for reasons of blasphemy and the violent reactions against the recently released YouTube movie Innocence of Muslims in September 2012. And the list goes on.

Keywords

Political Theory Free Speech Democratic Regime Political Ideal Religious People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Anders Berg-Sørensen 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anders Berg-Sørensen

There are no affiliations available

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