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North Korea and Kim Jong-un: Analysis of a New Era in the Kim Dynasty

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Abstract

This chapter will offer an introduction to a study designed to analyze how the initial years of the Kim Jong-un regime continued the threats that North Korea posed (and poses) to the region and the nation-states who have an interest in it — maintaining the rogue state identity of his country that his father and grandfather began. This chapter will give the reader a baseline of analysis for a work that focuses on several issues and concepts vital for the security of the region (and of those nation-states with an interest in it) as long as the DPRK (North Korea) continues to exist as a viable nation.

Keywords

Conflict analysis DPRK Kim Jong-un 

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Notes

  1. 7.
    For some interesting reading on North Korea’s nuclear program during the Kim Jong-il regime, see Victor D. Cha and David C. Kang, Nuclear North Korea: A Debate for Engagement Strategies (New York: Columbia University Press, 2003)Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Bruce E. Bechtol, Jr. 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Angelo State UniversityUSA

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