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The History of the Kansas City Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe

  • Theresa L. Torres
Chapter
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Abstract

On entering the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe, one’s eyes immediately are captured by her painted image above the high altar. A local artist depicted the dark skinned Madonna with a downcast head covered by a turquoise veil of stars, her hands folded in prayer, her body robed in a light pink gown with a maternity band, and her feet set upon a sliver of the moon and lifted by the wings of an angel. One is quickly in the company of the Guadalupanas, who are kneeling, praying their rosaries, and greeting one another in hushed tones. Along with a few young children, mainly granddaughters, their ages range from the 30s to the 80s. These members of the Guadalupana Society, approximately 90 percent of them women, are the patronesses of the Shrine, which was a parish until its closing in 1990.

Keywords

Kansas City Social Drama Parish Boundary Catholic Church Sacred Heart 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Victor Turner, Dramas, Fields, and Metaphors (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1974), 33.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Turner, 38–42. See also Kathleen M. Ashley, ed. Victor Turner and the Construction of Cultural Criticism (Bloomington, Indiana: U. of Indiana Press, 1990);Google Scholar
  3. Ronald Grimes, “Ritual Studies: A Comparative Review of Theodore Gaster and Victor Turner,” Religious Studies Review 2, no. 4 (1976): 13–25;Google Scholar
  4. E. Ring, “Victor Tuner, Sigmund Freud, and the Return of the Repress,” Ethos 21, no. 3 (1993): 273–294;CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Gilbert St. John, “Victor Turner and Contemporary Cultural Performance: An Introduction” in Victor Turner and Contemporary Cultural Performance (New York: Berghahn, 2008).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Victor Turner and Edith Turner, Image and Pilgrimage in Christian Culture (New York: Columbia University Press, 1978), 250. In Image and Pilgrimage, Turner and Turner explicate their notion of “communitas,” hence the reason for its insertion in this description.Google Scholar
  7. See also Tim Olaveson, “Collective Effervescence and Communitas: Processual Models of Ritual and Society in Emile Durkheim and Victor Turner,” Dialectical Anthropology 26 (2001): 89–124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 13.
    Victor Turner, Dramas, Fields, and Metaphors (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1974), 33.Google Scholar
  9. See Victor Turner and Edith Turner, Image and Pilgrimage in Christian Culture (New York: Columbia University Press, 1978), 250 where they explicate the notion of communitas.Google Scholar
  10. 19.
    See John T. McGreevy, Parish Boundaries: the Catholic Encounter with Race in the Twentieth-Century Urban North (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago, Press, 1996).Google Scholar
  11. 22.
    Fr. Jose Muñoz, “What about the Mexican Situation in Kansas City, Mo,” KCSJDA, OLGPF. Fr. Gerard La Mountain, O.R.S.A. “Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish,” KCSJCDA, OLGPF. For a history on the Cristero Rebellion, which fought against the anti-Catholic forces in the Mexican government from 1926–1929, see David C. Bailey, Viva Crísto Rey! The Cristero Rebellion and the Church-State Conflict in Mexico (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1974).Google Scholar
  12. 23.
    Fr. Jose Muñoz, “What about the Mexican Situation in Kansas City, Mo,” KCSJDA, OLGPF. Thomas E. Purcell, “Mexican Story,” GCIF, KCPL. Several groups assisted Fr. Muñoz in his new ministry to Mexicans living on the Westside. One well-known figure was the grand Knight of Columbus, Dr. Thomas Purcell. He secured the initial location for the priest’s residence and the first chapel. See also Catholic Register, 16 June 1940. See also Coleman, J. C. L. and Charles M. This Far by Faith: A Popular History of the Catholic People of West and Northwest Missouri, Vol. II The Fact (Kansas City, MO: Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph, MO, 1992): 178–79 and Fr. La Mountain and Gerard ORSA “Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish,” Kansas City St. Joseph Diocesan Archives, Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish Files.Google Scholar

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© Theresa L. Torres 2013

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  • Theresa L. Torres

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