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The Scholarship on Working-class Women’s Work and their Child Care Models

  • Melanie Reynolds

Abstract

This chapter will deal with the long, complex trajectory of women’s waged and unwaged work. Studies show that women have historically provided for their families and the family economy to a considerable degree. As a high IMR coincided with northern women’s introduction to industrialisation, contemporaries made, and historians have continued to make, strong connections between women’s work and a high infant mortality rate, with particular emphasis being placed on the culpability of factory work.

Keywords

Nineteenth Century Child Care Infant Mortality Eighteenth Century Married Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Melanie Reynolds 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melanie Reynolds
    • 1
  1. 1.Oxford Brookes UniversityUK

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