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Marxism and Popular Education in Latin America

  • Liam Kane
Chapter
Part of the Marxism and Education book series (MAED)

Abstract

At first glance there seems much in common between Marxism and popular education in Latin America. Both are theoretical constructs for analyzing and changing the world; both are concerned with the welfare of the oppressed; both relate to organizations or movements of people, as well as to sociopolitical theory. But drawing too close an association between the two is problematic. Marxists often criticize popular educators and vice-versa, and the different currents, tendencies, interpretations, and expressions of both Marxism and popular education inhibit simple comparisons.

Keywords

Political Party Social Movement Participatory Democracy Ruling Idea Popular Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sara C. Motta and Mike Cole 2013

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  • Liam Kane

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