Advertisement

Baudelaire with Badiou

Event and Subjectivity in “L’Héautontimorouménos”
Chapter
  • 97 Downloads

Abstract

In her recent book Uses of Literature, Rita Felski opposes “grand theory,” and the “autonomous, difficult art” it tends to favor, to “the heterogeneous, and politically variable, uses of literary texts in daily life.” Such a division poses an implicit challenge for reflection on the relationship of philosophy to literature. Taking a lead from Felski’s effort to “build better bridges” between the two, I would like to reflect specifically on the ways in which nineteenth-century French poetry and contemporary French philosophy enter into a dialectical relationship that helps us navigate between the Scylla of—overly?—hermetic philosophical approaches and the Charybdis of potentially unreflective “common sense” approaches. Felski seeks to demonstrate that both theoretical and commonsense approaches can be “powered by, and indebted to, many of the same motives and structures” (Felski 13). We may say the same of philosophy, in that it springs from basic questions about how life should be lived, yet seeks answers that refuse simplistic or too commonly held views in order to cast new light on lived experience, and even to change that experience through the very act of reflecting on it.

Keywords

Literary Critic Literary Text Dialectical Relationship Poetic Language Lyric Subject 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Works Cited

  1. Badiou, Alain. The Century. Trans. Alberto Toscano. Cambridge: Polity, 2007.Google Scholar
  2. —. Conditions. Trans. Steven Corcoran. London: Continuum, 2008.Google Scholar
  3. —. Manifesto for Philosophy. Trans. Norman Madarasz. Albany: State U of New York P, 1999.Google Scholar
  4. Baudelaire, Charles. The Flowers of Evil. Trans. William Aggeler. Fresno: Academy Library Guild, 1954.Google Scholar
  5. —. Œuvres complètes. Paris: Gallimard, 1975–76.Google Scholar
  6. Bensaïd, Daniel. “Alain Badiou and the Miracle of the Event.” Think Again: Alain Badiou and the Future of Philosophy. Ed. Peter Hallward. London: Continuum, 2004. 94–105.Google Scholar
  7. Bersani, Leo. Baudelaire and Freud. Berkeley: U of California P, 1977.Google Scholar
  8. Buvik, Per. “La notion baudelairienne de l’ironie.” Revue Romane 31.1 (1996): 87–98.Google Scholar
  9. De Man, Paul. Blindness and Insight. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1983.Google Scholar
  10. Felski, Rita. Uses of Literature. Malden: Blackwell, 2008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Hallward, Peter. Introduction. Think Again: Alain Badiou and the Future of Philosophy. Ed. Peter Hallward. London: Continuum, 2004. 1–20.Google Scholar
  12. Hemel, Ernstvan den. “Included but Not Belonging: Badiou and Rancière on Human Rights.” Krisis: Journal for Contemporary Philosophy 3 (2008): 16–31.Google Scholar
  13. Laclau, Ernesto. “An Ethics of Militant Engagement.” Think Again: Alain Badiou and the Future of Philosophy. Ed. Peter Hallward. London: Continuum, 2004. 120–37.Google Scholar
  14. Lecercle, Jean-Jacques. “Badiou’s Poetics.” Think Again: Alain Badiou and the Future of Philosophy. Ed. Peter Hallward. London: Continuum, 2004. 208–17.Google Scholar
  15. Macherey, Pierre. “The Mallarmé of Alain Badiou.” Alain Badiou: Philosophy and Its Conditions. Ed. Gabriel Riera. Albany: State U of New York P, 2005. 109–15.Google Scholar
  16. Hemel, Ernstvan den. “Included but Not Belonging: Badiou and Rancière on Human Rights.” Krisis: Journal for Contemporary Philosophy 3 . The Object of Literature. Trans. David Macey. New York: Cambridge UP, 1995.Google Scholar
  17. Rancière, Jacques. “Aesthetics, Inaesthetics, Anti-Aesthetics.” Think Again: Alain Badiou and the Future of Philosophy. Ed. Peter Hallward. London: Continuum, 2004. 218–31.Google Scholar
  18. Riera, Gabriel. Alain Badiou: Philosophy and Its Conditions. Albany: State U of New York P, 2005.Google Scholar
  19. Sanyal, Debarati. The Violence of Modernity: Baudelaire, Irony, and the Politics of Form. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 2006.Google Scholar
  20. Wahl, François. “The Subtractive: Preface.” Conditions. By Alain Badiou. Trans. Steven Corcoran. London: Continuum, 2008. vii–xl.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Joseph Acquisto 2013

Authors and Affiliations

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations