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Introduction

  • Oren Meyers
  • Eyal Zandberg
  • Motti Neiger
Part of the Palgrave Macmillan Memory Studies book series (PMMS)

Abstract

This book aims to unravel a paradox: how can a society communicate awe? How can an event that is so markedly positioned at the limits of human experience (Friedlander, 1992a: 3) be mass mediated in a manner that is intelligible and meaningful and yet retains the aura of awe? That is, how do mass media bridge the gap between their default, standardizing modes of operation and anything-but-routine notions of reverence, fear and wonder? The Remembrance Day for the Holocaust and the Heroism Law of 1959 legislated by the Knesset (the Israeli Parliament) asserts that:

On Remembrance Day for the Holocaust and the Heroism two minutes of silence will be observed nationwide. All manner of work and transportation must cease to operate during this period of time. Memorial services, public gatherings and ceremonies will take place in military bases and educational institutions ... Programmes aired on the radio will express the uniqueness of the day; entertainment establishments will feature only appropriate contents.1

Keywords

Collective Memory Media Memory Israeli Society Holocaust Survivor Terror Attack 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Oren Meyers, Eyal Zandberg and Motti Neiger 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oren Meyers
    • 1
  • Eyal Zandberg
    • 2
  • Motti Neiger
    • 2
  1. 1.University of HaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Netanya Academic CollegeIsrael

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