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Why Is It Easy to Be a Psychoanalyst and a Feminist, But not a Psychoanalyst and a Social Scientist? Reflections of a Psychoanalytic Hybrid

  • Nancy J. Chodorow
Part of the Studies in the Psychosocial book series (STIP)

Abstract

I was asked to make these reflections on my dual identity and location as academic and psychoanalyst personal and informal, and so they are. I see them, in some ways, as both a continuation of and a contrast to our last meeting: my thinking was sparked by Paul Schwaber’s presentation, “The Pleasures of Mind,” in which Schwaber, a psychoanalyst and humanities professor, described the happy combination he has been able to make of psychoanalysis and literature. Here, I describe what I have found to be, from both sides, a not-so-happy combination.

Keywords

Personal Meaning Cultural Meaning Psychoanalytic Theory Individual Psychology Psychic Life 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Nancy J. Chodorow 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy J. Chodorow

There are no affiliations available

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