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The Notice: Rethinking Urban Governance in the Age of Mobility

  • Caroline Wanjiku Kihato
Part of the Africa Connects book series (AFC)

Abstract

All too often, policymakers and urban theorists use state weakness to explain persistent urban poverty, inequality, and conflict. Embedded in this approach is a Manichean cognitive frame that constructs African cities and urban spaces in binaries: as well-managed versus mismanaged, as formal versus informal, legal or illegal, or governed versus ungoverned. The resultant analyses suggest that the crises facing many African cities lie with state failures and governments’ inability to provide services, manage diversity, and enforce the law across Africa’s fast growing and fluid cities. If a weak or failed state is the basis of the urban crisis, it stands to reason that a strong state is the cornerstone of good governance, order, effective regulation, and the amelioration of poor socioeconomic conditions.

Keywords

Police Officer Asylum Seeker Good Governance Urban Space Migrant Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Caroline Wanjiku Kihato 2013

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  • Caroline Wanjiku Kihato

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