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1992: And the Football Is Back

  • Jeffrey J. Volle
Chapter
Part of the The Evolving American Presidency Series book series (EAP)

Abstract

The political conventions were over. Labor Day 1992 was upon the country. This would be the last weekend the American voter would not be bombarded on a daily basis with political ads. Most Americans knew then, as political scientists know today, that the economy was the driving force behind the 1992 election. Looking back at any past candidates’ pledges/programs/platforms can be a game of “I told you so” for either friend or foe. Governor Bill Clinton was no different.

Keywords

Presidential Election Democratic Party Vice President American People Electoral College 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Jeffrey J. Volle 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey J. Volle

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