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Mind over Matter: Risk and Stigma in Early Operating Theologies

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Part of the Palgrave Macmillan’s Content and Context in Theological Ethics book series (CCTE)

Abstract

Risk is one significant piece of HIV & AIDS discourse. Stigma associated with increased risk is another. Sociologist Erving Goffman defines what he considers to be the three types of stigma people most often experience: (1) “abomination of the body,” (2) “a blemish of individual character,” and/or (3) “the tribal stigmas of race, nation, or religion.”3 In other words, stigma regarding: (1) bodies in general, (2) what those bodies do, and (3) the ways in which different bodies are marked. HIV & AIDS, as with other STDs/STIs, carries a particularly weighty stigma because it tends to cut through each of these categories.

Keywords

Sexual Behavior African Descent Black Church Christian Theology Christian Church 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
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© Cassie J. E. H. Trentaz 2012

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