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Reluctance to Risk: The Story of the US Christian Church

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Part of the Palgrave Macmillan’s Content and Context in Theological Ethics book series (CCTE)

Abstract

Granted, there is no monolithic entity defined or manifested as “the Christian church” or even “the US Christian church” with consistent practices and unified beliefs. However, the various groups representing the Christian church share a long and complicated history of compassion and care for those living with disease/illness. This is in part because of the varying ways of interpreting suffering or pain within Christian traditions.

Keywords

Christian Tradition Reagan Administration Christian Theology Christian Church Christian Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Cassie J. E. H. Trentaz 2012

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