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The Language of “Risk”: Setting the Story

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Part of the Palgrave Macmillan’s Content and Context in Theological Ethics book series (CCTE)

Abstract

The story of HIV infection & the experience of AIDS is not, nor has it ever been, a story about an isolated biomedical condition. The virus’s transmission from one place to the entire globe within ten short years demonstrates our interconnectivity as people and nations. But the impacts of the epidemic also show the interconnectivity of human cultural systems and ideological structures. The story of HIV & AIDS is a story about politics, economics, and transnational relations as well as health/medicine, and any adequate understanding of this pandemic must be placed in historical context.

Keywords

Risk Behavior Risk Group Intravenous Drug User Homosexual Male Ideological Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Cassie J. E. H. Trentaz 2012

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