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Roots of Resistance and Possibility: A Theological Anthropology

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Part of the Palgrave Macmillan’s Content and Context in Theological Ethics book series (CCTE)

Abstract

It is becoming clear for many that some things need to change. Although change and movement are always a part of life, they are also always risky and often terrifying. Both those who benefit and those who suffer from current structures often fear even necessary change. One fears loss of security, control, consistency, respectability, and reputation. Yet, current events4 continue to drag these issues to the surface under which they are always bubbling whether we admit it or not.

Keywords

Human Dignity Human Genome Project Human Sexuality Christian Church African Philosophy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Cassie J. E. H. Trentaz 2012

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