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Libya: The Political Economy of Isolation

  • Leila Simona Talani
Chapter
  • 270 Downloads
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

Only a few days after the Egyptian revolution had achieved its climax with the fall of Hosni Mubarak, Libyans started a battle to topple their own dictator. However, contrary to the cases of Egypt and Tunisia, in Libya the battle was destined to last much longer as Ghadhafi refused to release power. Eventually the revolutionaries managed to achieve their aims only thanks to the intervention of NATO, which helped them take control of Tripoli six months after the beginning of the struggle, in late August 2011 (Boyle 2013).

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Political Economy Security Council Foreign Direct Investment Inflow Minimum Wage Increase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Leila Simona Talani 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leila Simona Talani
    • 1
  1. 1.King’s College LondonUK

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