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The Economic Marginalisation and Lack of Regionalisation of the MENA Area

  • Leila Simona Talani
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Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

The theoretical analysis discussed so far identified in the economic marginalisation of the MENA area and in its lack of political and economic integration a relevant political economy factor of the recent wave of political turmoil and change. From the theoretical point of view, the following issues appear particularly relevant:
  1. 1.

    The paradox of the lack of regionalisation of the MENA area within globalisation.

     
  2. 2.

    The paradox of marginalisation of the MENA area within globalisation.

     
  3. 3.

    The paradox of the empowerment of civil society amid the crisis of the state.

     

The MENA area is therefore at the crossroads of some of the most significant structural developments of the new global political economy.

Keywords

Saudi Arabia Economic Integration Arab Country Gulf Cooperation Council Free Trade Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Leila Simona Talani 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leila Simona Talani
    • 1
  1. 1.King’s College LondonUK

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