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The Paradox of Regionalisation within Globalisation: Some Theoretical Concerns

  • Leila Simona Talani
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Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

Despite there being no consensus on how to define globalisation or, as we have seen in the previous chapter, even on whether it exists, scholars of IPE from a variety of different academic standpoints are somewhat paradoxically in agreement that regionalisation is indeed happening. What is more controversial is however its relation with globalisation.

Keywords

European Union Regional Integration North American Free Trade Agreement International Account Standard Board Capitalist Class 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Leila Simona Talani 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leila Simona Talani
    • 1
  1. 1.King’s College LondonUK

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