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The Chinese Butterfly and the Arab Spring: Bread and Globalisation

  • Leila Simona Talani
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Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

There is no denying the role that the economy played in the revolts going under the name of the Arab Spring. The two people who set fire to themselves in Tunisia and Egypt, sparking the uprisings, did so for economic motivations.1 The protesters who took to the streets in Cairo, did so screaming ‘Bread’ (Aish) as one of their main slogans. Even in the academic literature on the Arab Spring there seems to be now some agreement on the relevance of economic factors (Noueihed and Warren 2012: 5–6; Maloney 2011: 66).2

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Civil Society Financial Market World Economy Food Price 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Leila Simona Talani 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leila Simona Talani
    • 1
  1. 1.King’s College LondonUK

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