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Introduction

  • Leila Simona Talani
Chapter
  • 274 Downloads
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

Starting in December 2010, the Arab world was swept away by a wave of demonstrations that soon became known as ‘The Arab Spring’.1

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Civil Society Political Economy Social Unrest Export Processing Zone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Leila Simona Talani 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leila Simona Talani
    • 1
  1. 1.King’s College LondonUK

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