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From Laggard to World Leader: The United Kingdom’s Adoption of Marine Wind Energy

  • Stephen Jay
Part of the Energy, Climate and the Environment Series book series (ECE)

Abstract

The idea of extending the capture of wind energy beyond the shoreline into the marine environment is not new, having been mooted since at least the 1970s (Musgrove 1978), and pilot projects date back to the 1990s, beginning with Denmark’s Vindeby scheme in 1991. However, in 2002 significant energy production from ‘offshore wind’ became a more promising prospect with the development of Horns Rev, again in Danish waters, consisting of 80 turbines 14–20 km from the coast. Some other north European countries have also contributed to growth or set out development plans, and are now being joined by nations elsewhere, notably the USA (Offshore Center Danmark 2011; Snyder and Kaiser 2009a, 2009b).

Keywords

Wind Energy Wind Farm Energy Policy Offshore Wind World Leader 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Stephen Jay 2012

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