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Crisis Discourse and Art Theory: Richard Wagner’s Legacy in Films by Veith von Fürstenberg and Kevin Reynolds

  • Stefan Keppler-Tasaki
Chapter
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Part of the The New Middle Ages book series (TNMA)

Abstract

Just as the history of cinema is haunted by the Middle Ages, the history of medieval cinema is haunted by the works of Richard Wagner. The symbiotic relationship between the medieval and the cinematic, as encapsulated in the compound “medieval cinema,” finds its early parallel in “Wagnerian medievalism.” After all, Wagner’s operas are drawn almost exclusively from medieval sources, characters, and stories, and recent research has confirmed one of the long-standing topoi of the debate on cinema’s origins, that is, that his works’ aesthetics is protoinematic.1

Keywords

Artistic Practice Theoretical Writing Cultural Reform Mainstream Cinema Medieval Source 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    See Matthew Wilson Smith, The Total Work of Art: From Bayreuth to Cyberspace (New York: Routledge, 2007), pp. 31, 93–94.Google Scholar
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  9. 9.
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    Veith von Fürstenberg, “Vorwort” [preface to a draft of the film], reprinted in Alain Kerdelhué, “Feuer und Schwert. Lecture materielle du mythe,” in Tristan et Iseut: mythe européen et mondial, ed. Danielle Buschinger (Göppingen: Kümmerle, 1987), pp. 193–94 [181–96] [my translation].Google Scholar
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© Andrew James Johnston, Margitta Rouse, and Philipp Hinz 2014

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  • Stefan Keppler-Tasaki

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