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MeÐ Lögum Skal Land Vort Byggja (With Law Shall the Land be Built): Law as a Defining Characteristic of Norse Society in Saga Conflicts and Assembly Sites Throughout the Scandinavian North Atlantic

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Part of the The New Middle Ages book series (TNMA)

Abstract

Gwyn Jones famously posited the notion of a cogent Norse identity as manifested by common language, culture, and mythology; further, as he clarified in his landmark work A History of the Vikings, law and its practice in local and national assemblies was a fundamental component of such a unifying cultural characteristic:

For the Scandinavian peoples in general, their respect for law, their insistence upon its public and democratic exercise at the Thing, and its validity for all free men, together with their evolution of a primitive and exportable jury system, is one of the distinctive features of their culture throughout the Viking Age … 1

Keywords

Assembly Site Scandinavian Language National Assembly Legislative Assembly Assembly Place 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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    Gwyn Jones, A History of the Vikings (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984), p. 348.Google Scholar
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    Jesse L. Byock, Viking Age Iceland (London: Penguin Books, 2001), p. 171.Google Scholar
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© Benjamin Hudson 2012

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