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Introduction: Icons of Irishness

  • Maggie M. Williams
Part of the The New Middle Ages book series (TNMA)

Abstract

This book is about objects that share visual properties but occupy distinct temporal moments of production and reception, execute different functions in their past and present incarnations, and engage multiple audiences in diverse ways. Each chapter is also about the cognitive and social processes that form Irish identities: collecting, performing, exhibiting, remembering, and proclaiming. These many strains of visibility and experience intertwine through time and space, nestling around the objects to generate webs of past, present, and perpetual meanings. The following chapters highlight that complexity by juxtaposing medieval and modern things, considering their significance for both scholarly and popular audiences, and allowing them to penetrate into the distant past from their vantage points in the here and now.

Keywords

Historical Moment Postcolonial Theory Affective Touch Irish Identity Medieval Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Maggie M. Williams 2012

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  • Maggie M. Williams

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