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Ulysses Turning European: the Different Faces of ‘Europeanization’ of Greek Immigration Policy

  • Georgia Mavrodi
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Part of the Migration, Minorities and Citizenship book series (MMC)

Abstract

A striking feature of the ‘Greek case’ is the magnitude of its unexpected, undesired and rapid transformation from a country of emigration to one of immigration, directly connected to the collapse of the former communist regimes in the Balkans and in the former Soviet Union. Whereas in the mid-1980s the number of foreign residents was estimated at 65,000, the total number of immigrants (both legally and illegally resident) rose to approximately 1 million in the year 2000 (Cavounidis 2002: 48) and remains at 960,000 at present (Agelioforos 26 June 2005). If these estimations are correct, foreign residents currently account for almost 9 per cent of the Greek population, one of the highest immigrant population rates among the European Union (EU) member states. Compared to other member states, Greece’s immigrant population displays three distinct characteristics: it overwhelmingly originates in directly neighbouring countries; it is dominated by a single ethnic group, namely Albanian citizens; and it has been involved in clandestine entry and/or residence.

Keywords

European Union Immigration Policy European Union Member State Family Reunification European Union Level 
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Copyright information

© Georgia Mavrodi 2007

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  • Georgia Mavrodi

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