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Intersubjective Meaning

  • Rob Allen
  • Nina Krebs

Abstract

The difference between the birth and the origins of something is the difference between the cry of new life and the song of the collective chorus; the difference between the beat of a new heart and the pulsat­ing drumbeat of our ancestors. Birth, pink and rosy, looks forward. It does not need to justify itself, for it is full of strength, discovery, dance and laughter. Life does not ask such promise to justify itself. Yet, in times of challenge, of the abyss, the ‘me’ is not enough. The collective, psychological, spiritual, ‘we’ is necessary. Drama and storytelling offer us this union.

Keywords

High Reward Personal Story Container Model Dramatic Action Mental Health Research Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Rob Allen and Nina Krebs 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rob Allen
  • Nina Krebs

There are no affiliations available

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