Advertisement

The Problem of Institutional Responsibility and the European Union

Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in European Union Politics book series (PSEUP)

Abstract

In order to provide an analytical foundation for this volume on the EU’s global role, my aim in this chapter is to outline a conceptual framework that enables us to assess institutional action in moral terms. It is hoped that this can help to understand what is normatively entailed by the more specific claims made in subsequent chapters about the EU as a responsible actor in international affairs. I will try to show that once we get a grip on the notion of institutional agency and the concomitant notion of institutional responsibility, it will be much easier to make headway on what specific responsibilities the EU may have and what failings and achievements it can be held responsible for in retrospect. It seems to me that we should say not only that institutions are in many cases better equipped than individuals to discharge certain duties, but also that some institutions are clearly better equipped to do so than others. Should we find that this also holds true for the EU in certain areas, then we may be able to draw conclusions directly relevant to policy-making.

Keywords

Moral Responsibility International Relation Moral Agent Moral Duty Moral Consideration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Bibliography

  1. Barry, Christian, ‘Global justice: aims, arrangements, and responsibilities’, in Toni Erskine (ed.), Can Institutions Have Responsibilities? (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave, 2003).Google Scholar
  2. Erskine, Toni, ‘Making sense of “responsibility” in international relations: key questions and concepts’, in Toni Erskine (ed.), Can Institutions Have Responsibilities? (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave, 2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. French, Peter, Collective and Corporate Responsibility (New York: Columbia University Press, 1984).Google Scholar
  4. Hart, Herbert L.A., ‘Postscript Responsibility and Retribution’, in Herbert L.A. Hart (ed.), Punishment and Responsibility: Essays in the Philosophy of Law (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1968).Google Scholar
  5. Lang, Anthony, Jr., ‘The United Nations and the fall of Srebrenica: Meaningful responsibility and international society’, in Toni Erskine (ed.), Can Institutions Have Responsibilities? (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave, 2003).Google Scholar
  6. Miller, David, ‘Distributing responsibilities’, Journal of Political Philosophy vol. 9, no. 4 (2001), 453–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. O’Neill, Onora, ‘Who can endeavour peace?’, in Copp, David (ed.), Nuclear Weapons, Deterrence, and Disarmament, Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 12, University of Calgary Press, 1986, 41–73.Google Scholar
  8. O’Neill, Onora, ‘From statist to global conceptions of justice’, in Hubig, Christoph (ed.), Cognitio humana — Dynamik des Wissens und der Werte (Leipzig: Akademie Verlag, 1996), 367–79.Google Scholar
  9. Quinton, Anthony, Social objects. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 76, Oxford: Blackwell 1975, 1–27.Google Scholar
  10. Runciman, David, ‘Moral responsibility and the problem of representing the state’, in Toni Erskine (ed.), Can Institutions Have Responsibilities? (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave, 2003).Google Scholar
  11. Smith, E. Karen, ‘EU external relations’, in Michelle Cini (ed.), European Union Politics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003).Google Scholar
  12. Walzer, Michael, ‘The politics of rescue’, Social Research, vol. LXII, no. 1 (1995), 53–66.Google Scholar
  13. Williams, Bernard A.O., ‘Is international rescue a moral issue?’, Social Research vol. LXII no. 1 (1995), 67–75.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2006

Authors and Affiliations

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations