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Human Well-being: Concepts and Conceptualizations

  • Des Gasper
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Development Economics and Policy book series (SDEP)

Abstract

What should those who measure well-being try to measure? To address this question one must consider the nature of well-being, and the various purposes of the exercise of conceptualizing and measuring. This chapter concentrates on the nature of well-being, especially in the earlier sections; purposes will be addressed too, especially in the second part.

Keywords

Economic Goal Political Liberty Desire Theory Objective List Theory Eudaimonic Conception 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© United Nations University 2007

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  • Des Gasper

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