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“Misclick” on Democracy: New Media Use by Key Political Parties in Kenya’s Disputed December 2007 Presidential Election

  • George Nyabuga
  • Okoth Fred Mudhai
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Macmillan Series in International Political Communication book series (PIPC)

Abstract

While the use of “new” media by key political parties and presidential candidates has intensified in recent Kenyan presidential elections, the controversial December 2007 poll laid bare the limits of technology’s role in democracy. We argue that while new media may have some potential to help monitor and mobilize political activity, and possibly encourage political engagement, they can also reinforce the positions of those in power not only due to their limitations but also by their manipulability by scheming human agents.

Keywords

Political Party Presidential Election Technology Acceptance Model Political Communication Political Elite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Okoth Fred Mudhai, Wisdom J. Tettey, and Fackson Banda 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Nyabuga
  • Okoth Fred Mudhai

There are no affiliations available

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