Advertisement

Addressing Capacity Deficits

  • Kempe Ronald HopeSr.
Chapter
  • 37 Downloads

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with the problem of capacity deficits. Ownership without the corresponding capacity to benefit from it must be regarded as meaningless. The existence of capacity deficits in Africa is seen as a pressing problem that could contribute to the derailment of the progress made in development performance in many African countries during the past few years, and which will also significantly hamper progress toward the potential attainment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and, hence, sustained development on the continent.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Civil Society Corporate Governance African Country Millennium Development Goal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. ACBF (African Capacity Building Foundation) (2005). Annual Report 2004. Harare, Zimbabwe: ACBF.Google Scholar
  2. ACBF (African Capacity Building Foundation) (2006). Annual Report 2005. Harare, Zimbabwe: ACBF.Google Scholar
  3. Ahmad, J., Devarajan, S., Khemani, S., and Shah, S. (2005). “Decentralization and Service Delivery,” World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 3603. Washington, DC: World Bank.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Alence, R. (2004). “Political Institutions and Developmental Governance in Sub-Saharan Africa,” Journal of Modern African Studies 42(2): 163–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. AU (African Union) (2005). Review of Progress Towards the Millennium Development Goals. Addis Ababa: African Union.Google Scholar
  6. CFA (Commission for Africa) (2005). Our Common Interest: Report of the Commission for Africa. London: Commission for Africa.Google Scholar
  7. Docquier, F., and Marfouk, A. (2006). “International Migration by Education Attainment, 1990–2000.” In C. Özden and M. Schiff. (eds.), International Migration, Remittances, and the Brain Drain. Houndmills, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  8. Fukuyama, F. (2004). State Building: Governance and World Order in the 21st Century. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Hatchard, J., Ndulo, M., and Slinn, P. (2004). Comparative Constitutionalism and Good Governance in the Commonwealth: An Eastern and Southern African Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Hope, K. R. (2000). “Corruption and Development in Africa.” In K. R. Hope and B. C. Chikulo (eds.), Corruption and Development in Africa: Lessons from Country Case-Studies. Houndmills, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  11. —. (2002a). “From Crisis to Renewal: Towards a Successful Implementation of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development,” African Affairs 101(404): 387–402.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. —. (2002b). From Crisis to Renewal: Development Policy and Management in Africa. Leiden: Brill Publishers.Google Scholar
  13. —. (2005). “Toward Good Governance and Sustainable Development: The African Peer Review Mechanism,” Governance 18(2): 283–311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. —. (2006). “Capacity Development and Good Governance.” In A. Huque and H. Zafarullah. (eds.), International Development Governance. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press/Taylor and Francis Group.Google Scholar
  15. —. (2007). “Toward Capacity Development for Good Governance in Developing Societies: Some Lessons from the Field.” Unpublished Manuscript.Google Scholar
  16. Hope, K. R., and Chikulo, B. C. (eds.) (2000). Corruption and Development in Africa: Lessons From Country Case-Studies. Houndmills, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  17. Janneh, A. (2005). “Statement to the Annual Meeting of the African Development Bank Symposium on Capacity to Achieve the Millennium Development Goals,” Abuja, Nigeria, May 17.Google Scholar
  18. Johnson, J. K., and Nakamura, R. T. (1999). “A Concept Paper on Legislatures and Good Governance,” http://www.undp.org/governance.
  19. Levy, B., and Kpundeh, S. (eds.) (2004). Building State Capacity in Africa: New Approaches, Emerging Lessons. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  20. Mbaku, J. M. (2007). Corruption in Africa: Causes, Consequences, and Cleanups. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.Google Scholar
  21. Mizrahi, Y. (2004). “Capacity Enhancement Indicators: Review of the Literature,” WBI Working Papers. Washington, DC: World Bank Institute.Google Scholar
  22. Mullan, F. (2005). “The Metrics of the Physician Brain Drain,” New England Journal of Medicine 353(17): 1810–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. NEPAD Secretariat (2001). The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD). Midrand, South Africa: NEPAD Secretariat.Google Scholar
  24. OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) (2006). The Challenge of Capacity Development: Working Towards Good Practice. Paris: OECD.Google Scholar
  25. PHR (Physicians for Human Rights) (2004). An Action Plan to Prevent Brain Drain: Building Equitable Health Systems in Africa. Boston: PHR.Google Scholar
  26. Saldanha, C. (2006). “Rethinking Capacity Development,” International Public Management Review 7(2): 15–42.Google Scholar
  27. Sander, C., and Maimbo, S. M. (2005). “Migrant Remittances in Africa: A Regional Perspective.” In S. M. Maimbo and D. Ratha (eds.), Remittances: Development Impact and Future Prospects. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  28. Siri, G. (2002). “The World Bank and Civil Society Development: Exploring Two Courses of Action for Capacity Building,” WBI Working Papers. Washington, DC: World Bank Institute.Google Scholar
  29. UN (United Nations) (2005). The Millennium Development Goals Report 2005. New York: United Nations.Google Scholar
  30. — (2007). Africa and the Millennium Development Goals: 2007 Update. New York: United Nations.Google Scholar
  31. UNDP (United Nations Development Programme) (2003). Human Development Report 2003. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  32. UNECA (United Nations Economic Commission for Africa) (2005). The Millennium Development Goals in Africa: Progress and Challenges. Addis Ababa: UNECA.Google Scholar
  33. UNIDO (United Nations Industrial Development Organization) (2004). Industrial Development Repot 2004: Industrialization, Environment and the Millennium Development Goals in Sub-Saharan Africa. Vienna: UNIDO.Google Scholar
  34. World Bank (2005a). Meeting the Challenge of Africa’s Development: A World Bank Group Action Plan. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  35. — (2005b). “Effective States and Engaged Societies: Capacity Development for Growth, Service Delivery, and Empowerment in Africa,” Draft Concept Note. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  36. — (2005c). “Effective States and Engaged Societies: Capacity Development for Growth, Service Delivery, Empowerment, and Security in Africa,” Progress Report. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  37. — (2006). Global Economic Prospects: Economic Implications of Remittances and Migration. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  38. — (2007). Global Development Finance 2007. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  39. World Bank and IMF (International Monetary Fund) (2004). Global Monitoring Report 2004: Policies and Actions for Achieving the Millennium Development Goals and Related Outcomes. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  40. — (2005). Global Monitoring Report 2005: Millennium Development Goals: From Consensus to Momentum. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  41. — (2007). Global Monitoring Report 2007: Millennium Development Goals: Confronting the Challenges of Gender Equality and Fragile States. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kempe Ronald Hope, Sr. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kempe Ronald HopeSr.

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations