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The Alevis—a “New” Religious Minority? Identity Politics in Turkey and Its Relation to the EU Integration Process

  • Elisabeth Özdalga
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Part of the Palgrave Studies in Governance, Security, and Development book series (GSD)

Abstract

The Alevis are a heterodox Islamic group that especially venerates the fourth caliph, Ali, son-in-law of the Prophet Muhammed. The followers of Ali, or Ali’s party, Shi’at Ali, emerged out of the controversy over the legitimate leadership of the newly formed Muslim community. In the power struggles, following the death of the Prophet, Ali was killed (661), as was, at a later stage, his son Husayn (680). Even though Turkish Alevis share their reverence for Ali with different Shi’a groups, their rituals and beliefs are distinctly different from other forms of Shi’ism, such as that predominant in Iran, which is more sharia-minded and more focused on the role of the religious leadership—the imamate.

Keywords

European Union Religious Minority Cultural Pluralism Religious Culture Turkish Republic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Dietrich Jung and Catharina Raudvere 2008

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  • Elisabeth Özdalga

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