Desire and Denial

  • Richard Fantina

Abstract

Though sodomy can be variously defined as any of a number of different “unnatural acts,” the sense in which the term is used here refers to anal penetration. Bersani’s explorations of Freudian theory reveal a strong link between masochism and sodomy. Bersani’s work suggests that the position of the passive partner in consensual sodomy is inherently masochistic and experienced as such. Submitting to sodomy can be both painful and accompanied by an aura of humiliation, what Bersani calls “a self-debasement.”1 Heterosexual sodomy with the man in the passive role forms an integral element in much contemporary erotic masochistic literature.

Keywords

Assure Beach Stein Fishing Fist 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    Leo Bersani, “Is the Rectum a Grave?” in AIDS, Cultural Analysis, Cultural Activism, ed. Douglas Crimp (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1988), 220.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    The Boston Women’s Health Collective, The New Our Bodies, Ourselves: A Book By and For Women (New York: Simon and Shuster, 1984, 1992), 218.Google Scholar
  3. 4.
    Susie Bright, interview, in Angry Women, ed. Andrea Juno and V. Vale (San Francisco: Re/Search Publications, 1991), 216.Google Scholar
  4. 5.
    Jonathan Goldberg, Reclaiming Sodom (New York and London: Routledge, 1994), 3. All references are cited by page in the text.Google Scholar
  5. 13.
    Feinberg Leslie, Transgender Warriors: Making History from Joan of Arc to Ru Paul (Boston: Beacon Press, 1996), X.Google Scholar
  6. 16.
    Clyde Smith, “How I Became a Queer Heterosexual,” in Straight With a Twist: Queer Theory and the Subject of Heterosexuality, ed. Calvin Thomas (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2000), 61.Google Scholar
  7. 24.
    Mary Welsh Hemingway, How It Was (New York: Ballantine, 1976), 466. All references will be to this edition and are cited by page in the text.Google Scholar
  8. 25.
    Judith Fetterly, The Resisting Reader A Feminist Approach to American Fiction (Bloomington, Indiana University Press, 1978), 71.Google Scholar
  9. 26.
    Rena Sanderson, “Hemingway’s Literary Sisters: The Author though the Eyes of Women Writers,” in Hemingway and Women, ed. Lawrence R. Broer and Gloria Holland, 286. All references are cited by page in the text.Google Scholar
  10. 27.
    Gerry Brenner, A Comprehensive Companion to Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast: Annotation to Interpretation, Studies in American Literature, Volumes 37a and 37b (Lewiston: The Edwin Mellon Press, 2000), 330.Google Scholar
  11. 28.
    Arnold Samuelson, With Hemingivay: A Year in Key West and Cuba (New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1984), 64. AIl references are cited by page in the text.Google Scholar
  12. 29.
    Roger Whitlow, Cassandra’s Daughters: The Women in Hemingway (Westport, CT and London: Greenwood Press, 1984), 113. All references are cited by page in the text.Google Scholar
  13. 31.
    Kathy G. Willingham, “Hemingway’s The Garden of Edenx: Writing with the Body” in The Hemingway Review, 12(2) (1993), 46. Unless otherwise noted, all references to Willingham are to this work and are cited by page in the text.Google Scholar
  14. 32.
    Amy Lovell Strong, “‘Go to Sleep, Devil’: The Awakening of Catherine’s Feminism in The Garden of Eden,” in Hemingway and Women, ed. Lawrence R. Broer and Gloria Holland, 192–193. All references are cited by page in the text.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Richard Fantina 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Fantina

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations