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Hemingway and Theories of Masochism

  • Richard Fantina

Abstract

More than most authors, Hemingway dwells at length on the process of artistic creation and few have taken the aesthetics and mechanics of fiction and the production of art in general as seriously as he did. Jake Barnes, a reporter in The Sun Also Rises, and David Bourne, a novelist in The Garden of Eden, are just two examples of Hemingway heroes who reflect on the art of writing. Robert Jordan in For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940) considers writing of his experiences and Thomas Hudson in Islands in the Stream is a successful painter. These characters, together with Hemingway’s accounts of writing in Green Hills of Africa, Death in the Afternoon, and elsewhere, all point to his self-conscious identity as artist. Psychoanalysis offers some theories to account for artistic production.

Keywords

Historical Trauma Traditional Masculinity Dominant Woman Courtly Love Genital Sexuality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Sigmund Freud, Five Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis, trans. James Strachey (New York: Norton, 1977), 44.Google Scholar
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    Ernest Hemingway, Islands in the Stream (1970) (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1997), 296. Unless otherwise noted, all references to this work are to this edition and are cited by page in the text. Where necessary for clarification, this title is abbreviated to ITTS.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Richard Fantina 2005

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  • Richard Fantina

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