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Introduction

  • Brian Rappert
  • Stuart Croft
Part of the New Security Challenges Series book series (NSECH)

Abstract

The study of international security has always been a very controversial field. Contestations over issues as important as war and peace, liberation and subjugation, invasion and non-intervention are to be expected. But over the past twenty-five years, there have been not only normative struggles over these key issues — illustrated most dramatically recently by the arguments over the war in Iraq — but also arguments over what counts as ‘security’ itself. Security for whom, and from what, has been at the forefront of academic texts in international relations in the English-speaking world, and also throughout continental Europe.

Keywords

International Relation National Security Nuclear Weapon International Security Chemical Weapon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Brian Rappert 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian Rappert
  • Stuart Croft

There are no affiliations available

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