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Governing Intimacy in the World Bank

  • Kate Bedford
Chapter

Abstract

Introduction This chapter charts the policymaking efforts of gender staff in the World Bank — the world’s largest and most influential development institution.1 It attempts to analyse those efforts through the lens of governance, a process that draws on four particularly important insights:
  1. (1)

    That governance, as “a system of rules for public life,” involves multiple sites and actors employing heterogeneous strategies oriented to numerous — and sometimes conflicting — ends (Waylen and Rai, this book; Rose 1999: 21; Mosse and Lewis 2005). The state is only one actor among many here, and multilateral institutions have become increasingly central players in global governance debates (Lamer and Walters 2004a).

     
  2. (2)

    That the deployment of expertise is a key mechanism of governance (Valverde 1998; Terry 1999). (3) That there are crucial links between micro and macro governance projects. Using Nikolas Rose’s formulation, government refers to the processes through which individuals are urged and educated to bridle their own passions and control their own instincts (Valverde 1998; Rose 1999).

     
  3. (3)

    That there are crucial links between micro and macro governance projects. Using Nikolas ose’s formulation, government refers to the processes through which individuals are urged and ducated to bridle their own passions and control their own instincts (Valverde 1998; Rose 1999: 3). The governance perspective thus presupposes the freedom of the governed (Rose 1999: 4), but it considers how apparent exercises of free will are connected, in complex and uneven ways, to larger social, economic, and political processes (Cruikshank 1999). For example the family has often been a target of state management efforts, and many attempts to achieve national and imperial prosperity have relied on expert interventions into individual lives, using notions of hygiene, education, health, and so on (Rose 1999: 6; Levine 2003). This insight provides space to consider how multilateral institutions oriented to economic development, trade, and finance, are involved in governance of micro level concerns.

     
  4. (4)

    That analysis of governance involves tracking the common-sense nature, or normativity, of discourses entrenched as self-evident (Rai, Chapter 1, this book). Specifically, the governance lens requires a disturbance of what forms the “groundwork of the present,” to make the given seem strange and to question what is taken as natural (Rose 1999: 58).

     

Keywords

Social Reproduction Policy Entrepreneur International Development Association Bank Staff Multilateral Institution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kate Bedford 2008

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  • Kate Bedford

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